Drunk Driving

Despite recent reductions in fatalities, impaired driving remains one of America's deadliest social problems. In 2004, nearly 13,000 drivers or motorcycle operators died in crashes with a BAC level of .08 or above- the illegal limit in all states. Most people don't intend to drive home drunk, but too many find themselves at the end of the night without a sober designated driver. Unfortunately, many of these drivers convince themselves and friends that they are able to drive with the comment, "I'm okay, I'm just buzzed."

Statistics

In Indiana, like most states, there has been a decline in drunk driving deaths and in the percentage of total fatalities that are alcohol related in the last twenty years. The most drunk driving deaths occurred in 1988, with 530, while the percentage of alcohol related fatalities peaked in 1982 and 1986 with 52% of the total traffic deaths. In 2005, out of all traffic fatalities, 29% involved a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08 or higher, the highest level in several years.

Year
Fatalities
Total
Alc-Rel
%
0.08+
%
1982
961
504
52
437
46
1983
1,016
505
50
453
45
1984
925
474
51
414
45
1985
974
445
46
379
39
1986
1,038
539
52
453
44
1987
1,055
454
43
379
36
1988
1,099
530
48
461
42
1989
971
447
46
388
40
1990
1,049
485
46
432
41
1991
1,022
493
48
440
43
1992
901
375
42
309
34
1993
901
351
39
288
32
1994
971
353
36
304
31
1995
960
348
36
299
31
1996
984
350
36
297
30
1997
935
331
35
296
32
1998
982
405
41
350
36
1999
1,020
384
38
322
32
2000
886
303
34
246
28
2001
909
320
35
262
29
2002
792
262
33
216
27
2003
834
262
31
223
27
2004
947
299
32
254
27
2005
938
320
34
273
29